Poor Mental and Physical Health of Formerly Incarcerated People Attributed to Reintegration Barriers
Date:  11-26-2019

Study finds "re-entry work has been far too narrowly focused on recidivism"
From Rutgers-Camden Now:

Formerly incarcerated individuals with barriers to re-entry and service needs following their release are subsequently more likely to experience poor physical and mental health, according to an eye-opening new Rutgers University–Camden study.

The study examined how multiple barriers to reintegration related to employment, housing, childcare, and service needs accumulate to influence physical and mental health.

Daniel Semenza and Nathan Link, assistant professors of criminal justice at Rutgers–Camden, analyzed data on recently incarcerated men from the Serious and Violent Offender Re-entry Initiative (SVORI) to examine how multiple barriers to reintegration related to employment, housing, childcare, and service needs accumulate to influence physical and mental health three, nine, and 15 months after release.

“It’s a prison re-entry study that examines outcomes other than recidivism,” says Link. “In general, re-entry work has been far too narrowly focused on recidivism.” Continue reading>>>